Forums Coolval Family (drama) Eka's story

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    Episode 1
    “Out! Get out of my house! You have eaten all your
    siblings, your broth ers and sisters are dead and you
    know why they are dead! You killed them, witch!”
    shouted Mr. Effiong. “No papa; I ate no one. Please
    don’t send me away, I have nowhere to go.” Ekaette
    pleaded tearfully. Mr. Effiong raised his machete and
    swung it at his daughter. She ducked but not quickly
    enough. The tip of the machete grazed the skin of her
    neck and she yelled in pain, “He has killed me oh! I am
    dead! I am dead o!” “No! You are not dead Ekaette!
    The reason you are still alive is simply that I don’t
    want to stain my hands with blood. But if you don’t
    step away from this house this very minute, I am going
    to spill your blood!” “Daddy please, have mercy on me, I
    am not a witch. I did not eat my brothers and sisters.”
    “I said get out of my house!” Mr. Effiong raised his
    machete again and began to slap his fourteen year old
    daughter around with the side of the machete. Eka, as
    she was fondly called, rolled on the floor yelling in
    heart-wrenching pain as her fair, supple, soft skin
    reddened and tore open.
    From the bedroom Ufoma, her mother ran out, dragging
    behind her a Ghana-must-go bag. She dragged the bag
    through the living room and out of the house and
    dumped it on the street. She then ran into the house
    and joined her husband in the callous attack against
    their teenage daughter. Ufoma kicked Eka, punched her,
    dug her nails into her skin and then buried her teeth
    into her back. Ekaette’s cry could have melted the
    hardest of hearts; but sadly not a soul on the street
    came out to help the girl. On the street people were
    heard saying, “Eheh! Finally, Effiong and his wife have
    decided to drive away the little pretty witch who ate all
    the children in our street.” Eka bled from all over her
    body. At some point she gave up hope that she would
    survive the ordeal. When her mother saw that she could
    no longer utter a cry, or raise her hand to defend
    herself from punches and waves of machete-slaps she
    and her husband unleashed on their daughter, Ufoma
    asked her husband to stop beating Eka. She then knelt
    close to her and tore with her bare hands every piece
    of wear on Ekaette’s body. When she was done, she
    dragged her by the hand into the street and left her on
    the ground.
    While Eka lay on the street, a swarm of flies settled on
    her naked body to lick her wounds. She was too weak to
    stir a limb, so she let them have their fill of her bloody
    wounds. Passers-by mistook her for dead and wondered
    how a young pretty girl like her came to meet death in
    the gruesome fashion they saw her. Sadly for Eka, it
    began to rain. With the rain, her skin began to burn
    intensely, but the swarm of flies fluttered away for
    cover from the rain. Eka tried to get off the ground
    but could not, so she lay back on the ground and hopped
    that death would pity her and snuff the life out of her.
    The rain which began as light showers turned to a
    heavy downpour; still Eka lay on the ground. There she
    wailed and cried, but her voice was too faint for any to
    hear. She had cried herself hoarse. Then a momentary
    help came; Simbi her only friend and the only person
    who believed she was not a witch ran into the rain with
    her six year old brother and lifted Eka to a shed by
    the street side and put her on a table. There they
    cleaned her many wounds with a piece of cloth they
    took from the Ghana-must-go bag which contained her
    belongings.
    Simbi and her brother worked hard and fast to help
    Ekaette. They were afraid of being seen by their
    parents; if that was to happen all hell would break
    loose, and more so if Iya Jegede was to see Ekaette on
    her table. She would raise hell over that and claim that
    her shed and the table where she sold her wares had
    been defiled by bringing a witch to sit on her table.
    When Simbi and her brother were done, they helped Eka
    into another clothe taken from her Ghana-must-go
    bag. Simbi squeezed two hundred Naira into Eka’s hand
    and said with tears in her eyes, “Eka, this is all I have.
    I saved it from selling tomatoes for my mother. Use it
    and get away from here. Those two people who did this
    to you, they are not your parents. I believe they
    adopted you and now they want you out of their house
    by all means. Go far away from here and don’t ever
    come back. Here is my father’s phone number, you can
    call me whenever you need to talk to someone; just
    don’t tell my father you are Ekaette. Okay?” Eka said
    nothing; she simply stared emptily right through Simbi
    and her brother as tears flowed from her eyes. Simbi
    wanted to hug her for the last time, but could not
    because of her many wounds. She did not know if they
    would see again. She had to squeeze her hand and even
    that made Eka wince in pain.
    Simbi and her brother ran back into the rain to get
    home before their parents would notice they were gone.
    The rain did not let up till nightfall. While Simbi went
    about her home chores she wondered how her friend was
    doing. She was not sure she had eaten anything all day,
    and she knew no one on their street would offer her
    anything to eat. When Simbi could not bear the pain of
    the horror Ekaette her friend was going through, she
    scooped some food into a disposable plate and ran into
    the rainy night to give it to her. When she got to Iya
    Jegede’s shed, Ekaette was gone. Simbi felt pains
    stabbing at her heart. She cried silently and ran
    around their street to see if she could spot her. After
    about thirty minutes of searching for her she went
    home heartbroken.
    That rainy night, Ekaette had no clue about where to
    go. She just wanted to get away from her street and
    her parents who branded her a witch. Through the rainy
    night and with hunger gnawing away at her intestines,
    she trekked until her legs could carry her no longer.
    When she spotted an uncompleted building, she made for
    it to spend the night there. She did not want to spend
    the two hundred Naira Simbi gave her; it was her
    security against any eventuality. She dropped her bag
    on the rugged floor of the uncompleted building, laid
    her head on it and began to muse over her sad life. In-
    between her musings she sobbed. She knew she would not
    be able to sleep that night. The thoughts on her mind
    and the burning pains on her body would not let her
    sleep. As the thoughts of her sad life ran through her
    mind and she consoled herself with hot tears, she began
    to hear a hissing sound like that of a snake. She stared
    into the dark to see if she could make out anything.
    While she peered into the dark, her mind began to play
    tricks on her. Something seemed to be coming for her
    slithering on the floor like a huge snake. Fear seized
    her heart and she began to pant like an asthmatic
    patient. Without giving much thought to it, she sprang
    to her feet, grabbed her bag and fled from the
    uncompleted building.
    Ekaette could only be aptly described as a head-
    turning, drop-dead beautiful lass. It was hard to run
    into her without pausing to have a second look at her.
    Though she was just fourteen, somehow her beauty
    worked surreal magic on men which often left them
    stuttering on their words and acted stupidly in her
    presence. Her hair was the strangest thing about her,
    besides her near unbelievable beauty. A wisp of her hair
    felt strange to touch and stretched way down to her
    waist line. Because her parents were poor, she could not
    afford to go to a beauty salon to take care of her
    hair. So every once in a while she would wash her hair
    with hot water and apply petroleum jelly to it. In spite
    of that, her hair still looked great. Owing to her
    parent’s poor state, she could not go to school. To help
    ends meet at home, she had to sell fruits on her street.
    In spite of her beauty, there was no trace of arrogance
    about her. Not a few people admired her for her
    industriousness. Being the first child and having no
    grown up brother to help her with some manly home
    chores, she did every work in the home. She would push
    all by herself a barrow containing six twenty-five liter
    gallons of water to supply water to their house. And
    when she was done, she would go to sell oranges,
    cucumber, banana and watermelon in the street.

    to be continued.. stay tuned

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    Reply To: Eka's story

    episode2

    Children would often circle around her table asking her to give them some fruits. In spite of how hard poverty bit on their family, she would cut some oranges in bits and give the children. People saw that and loved her for it. However, that was the beginning of her problem. After some time, a few children in the street became sick. Their parents took them to hospitals, but hospitals could not help them; and they had to take them to spiritual houses where those children were diagnosed as having been bewitched. No one knew who bewitched the children, but all accusing fingers went in the direction of Eka. She was the one who gave the children fruits in the street and worrisomely her beauty made her look like a mermaid. Slowly many people began to believe the notion that Eka was a witch. Parents made sure that their children were not seen near her fruit table. Eka’s parents were confronted in the street by the parents of the sick children and warned to tell Ekaette to remove the witchcraft she put on their children. Eka’s parents did not believe one word of the claim that their daughter was a witch and so defended.
    While the accusations against Eka flew around, the sick children began to die one after another, and this made things worse for Eka and her parents. Many believed that Ekaette was supplying the children to her coven. The death of the children brought her fruit selling business in her street to a sudden end as even adults became afraid that Ekaette could also bewitch them. So not to be idle, she began to carry her fruits in a tray to some other streets to sell them; but not long after, the rumours followed her to those streets and people began to avoid buying fruits from her. When the pressure on her parents came to a head, they invited Eka to know if she was truly a witch. “Ekaette, I and your mother want the truth from you. We are your parents, don’t lie to us. Please Ekaette, are you a witch?” “Ah! Ah! Papa! How could you think such of me? I am not a witch!” “But Eka, the children who ate your oranges are dying off in the street?” “Why are the adults who bought and ate my oranges not dying? I am not a witch! I am shocked that you and mama have allowed the bad talk and rumours in the street to sway you.” “Eka we have not been swayed, we only want to be sure. Also they are saying that you are targeting little children for now.”
    Ekaette could not say another word; she could tell that her parents were shifting amazingly to what people were saying about her. All she could do was cry. After some time her mother came to console her and told her to forget the matter. Some months after the first round of children who took ill had all died. New batch of children in the street became sick and began to die. As it was earlier, Ekaette was accused even though her fruit selling business had wound up. People claimed that she had already initiated them to her coven through the fruits she gave to them and was only taking them out one after another. The matter came to its c----x when Ekaette’s brothers and sisters became sick as well. Her parents went berserk in their efforts to save their children. They took them from white garment churches to native doctors and to hospitals and nothing could be done to save the children. One after another, Ekaette’s four siblings succumbed to death. Tongues wagged in the street that because Ekaette could not find more children to supply to her coven, she turned on her brothers and sisters. Her parents were mocked in the street. When her parents could not bear the loss of their four children, they went to Oron to make enquiries about what actually killed their children. After days they returned to Calabar with the conviction that Ekaette ate her brothers and sisters and so threw her out of the house.
    That night as Ekaette ran from what she perceived to be a snake in the uncompleted building, a car almost ran over her. The driver of the car was a woman. She pulled her car up by the road side and went to see the young girl she thought she had killed. Still afraid, Ekaette jumped to her feet and tried to continue her run, but she felt giddy and slumped back to the ground. The lady who had brushed her with her Hyundai Accent flipped out and began to shout, thinking that Eka had died. A few passers-by stopped and helped the lady take Ekaette to the hospital. It took Eka about two weeks to recover from the hospital. The lady who had knocked her down was faithful to pay the hospital bills. The lady, who went by the name Efe, was shocked by the wounds she saw on Ekaette’s body and so asked her about it, “What happened to you? You have ugly wounds all over your body.” “My parents and my street branded me a witch…” She paused as she got very emotional. Efe waited for her to continue, “…when my brothers and sisters died in much the same fashion as some children on my street, my parents travelled to Oron and came back with the conclusion that I was responsible for their deaths as much as the other children who died in my street. They beat me up and threw me out of the house,” she continued. “Excuse me, do you mean children, including your siblings, began do die unexplainably in your street and then your parents concluded you were behind it?” “Yes, twelve children in all. Four out of the twelve are my siblings.”
    Efe paused and didn’t press further for answers; she sat beside her and thought deeply. From the night she met her there was something that struck her about Ekaette. She could not get her hands on what it was; but she was certain about one thing, Ekaette’s beauty was surreal, almost creepy. She could see why she was easily branded a witch. Efe reached out and touched Ekaette’s hair and felt its smoothness. The feel shocked her and she asked, “What do you do to your hair to make it look this way?” “Nothing. It has always been this way.” “Are you telling me you were born this way?” “Yes, I was born this way.” “Wow! Perhaps for your beauty they branded you a witch. You are unbelievably beautiful. Do you know that?” “Thank you. People tell me I am beautiful, but it was not for it that I was branded a witch. I was selling fruits on my street when the children became sick, so people concluded that I bewitched them through the fruits I gave them, but I did not. God knows I did not.” She began to cry again. “But did you give the children fruits?” “Yes, very often they would come to me asking for fruits and I would give them the little I could afford to give out what I had to sell.” “But did any of the children you often gave fruits die?” Ekaette could tell Efe was leaning more toward the idea that she was perhaps a witch and so did not answer her last question. She could see it in the way she looked at her. She remembered what she asked one of the doctors the night she was brought to the hospital, “Is the girl a human being? She looks like beauties from the water.” The doctor laughed and brushed aside her question.

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    ItzprinceItzprince
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    Episode 3
    Seeing she had hurt the girl deeply, Efe stood up and left the hospital. Though she paid for every ounce of Ekaette’s hospital bill, Efe was never seen in the hospital again. However there was a newly employed medical doctor who took a lot of interest in Ekaette. He was often around to have banter with her. About the time Eka was to be released from hospital, the young doctor, who went by the name Gerry, noticed that Eka became very moody and listless. So she pressed her to know what was wrong with her. For days Eka refused to answer him a word, but Gerry was persistent and kept asking her what the matter was with her. Eka dug her feet in and refused to give say much. On the day she was to be discharged from the hospital, she packed her stuff into her Ghana-must-go bag and made ready to check out of the hospital, and then Gerry showed up and took her to the little bunk which served as his office and pressed harder, “I know you are in some trouble, don’t lie to me. You were in this hospital for two weeks and not one member of your family came to visit you. I have not heard you speak of your father, mother or siblings. What are you hiding?” Eka burst into tears and told Gerry about everything that had happened to her. Gerry was shocked and brought to tears by her story. “Eka, I am not going to let you let you go into the street without anywhere to lay your head or money to survive on. I live in a two bedroom apartment all by myself. I can let you have one room. In fact I want you to take that room. I know people in this place who can help you get job as a cleaner. Please don’t go into the street. It is hard out there, you won’t survive it alone.”
    “No! I won’t take your offer doctor Gerry. You think I don’t know your plan. You want me to move in with you and become your toy, and tomorrow your girlfriend will come and throw me out. I know about all that. I have seen girls fall for it. I won’t do it. Yes I know I need help, but I won’t accept your offer.” Doctor Gerry almost went down on his knees and pleaded with her soulfully, “I am older than you are by some years Ekaette, and I know what the street is like. Believe me you don’t want to go into it with this your beauty and no financial support. Life and circumstances will push you into things that right now you think you can never do. I swear by God, I won’t take advantage of you. And if you accept my offer and find out tomorrow that I have gone against our understanding, you are free to leave my apartment. Look, you know me and my place of work; if I do anything stupid you can always come here and report me to my superiors. Please don’t go into the street without knowing even where you will sleep tonight or what you will eat.”
    Ekaette thought about Gerry’s words and squeezed the two hundred Naira Simbi gave her; it was all she had. “Okay Doctor Gerry I will accept your offer because I don’t have a better one right now. But I swear by God, if you do anything stupid, I will strip myself and curse you by night.” “It won’t come to that Ekaette. I promise you I will make you forget you once were thrown into the street by your family. One day you will look back and you will be happy you took my offer.” “I hope it all works out well, but if you try to put me through hell, I will curse you and kill myself. I mean every word of what I have just said.” “Ekaette you worry a great deal.” “I should and worry is my right. I don’t even know anything about you except your name. Moving into your apartment scares the daylight out of me. I wish I don’t have to do it. What if you wake up in the night and kill me for rituals? Who would ask you questions? After all my parents have rejected me.” “Stop! Ekaette stop! I don’t remember having seen anyone as negative as you. One, nobody is going to kill you for rituals. Two, worry is not your right; it actually hurts you more than you think.” “You have to understand Doctor Gerry that I do not have any reason to trust you. I am not being negative, but protective of myself.” “I have heard you Ekaette, no harm will come to you, okay. Now leave your bag here, let’s go get something to eat.” Reluctantly Eka left her Ghana-must-go bag in Doctor Gerry’s office and they left for the food canteen. When they entered the canteen heads turned in their direction as if they were being choreographed; and voices began to whisper. Ekaette felt very uncomfortable at the starry host of ocular daggers stabbing at them. Twice she missed her step and Doctor Gerry caught hold of her.
    The medical and non-medical staff who stared at them did not do so in disgust, but in sublime awe of the beauty which entered the canteen in Doctor Gerry’s company. However Eka did not know the reason for which they looked at them and whispered. Before the steward who would take their order could arrive, Eka had begun to perspire terribly and could hardly speak. Gerry noticed the change in the look of her face and asked, “Eka what is it? You don’t look alright to me.” Eka couldn’t speak; when she parted her lips words simply failed to come out. Gerry had to gently press her once more for answers, “Eka what is wrong with you?” When the words finally came out, they did so with tears, “They…they are…they are talking about me. Maybe someone… knows…” Eka began to choke terribly on her words, coughing and breathing deeply. Gerry understood that moment how much Eka had been hurt and lacerated by what she suffered in her street and in her parents’ hands. Doctor Gerry tried his best to stabilize her; when Eka had come round fully, he led her out of the canteen and those host of eyes admiringly followed Eka and Gerry out of the canteen.
    When they came back to Gerry’s office, he did his best to convince her that those people in the canteen were not talking about her, “Eka I actually heard them; some of them are my colleagues. They were not talking about you. Believe me there was no one there who knows you. There was no way they could have called you a witch.” While Gerry persuaded her that no one called her a witch, hot tears freely flowed from her eyes. “I thought I heard them calling me names. For a moment I thought I heard the word ‘witch’.” “Eka they were talking about your beauty. They were all swayed by your beauty. Believe me, when you start working here as a cleaner, most of the men who saw you today will press you out of measure with love advances and crazy gifts. Get ready for them. I want to take you home now, if you were to stay around here for a while longer, you will notice my office will become busy. All those men and women will come to ask me who you are. I know them.” Fearfully Eka asked, “Who will you tell them that I am?” “What do you want me to tell them if they ask?” “Tell them I am your sister.” “No Eka. I won’t tell them that. I will tell them that you are my friend, a good friend at that. I will speak of amazing things about you.” “But you know nothing about me to tell them.” “On the contrary I do. I know you are the prettiest woman my eyes have seen. I know you are very hard working. I also know you can make fruit salad, you told me about it the other day. And from our conversations since you came to this hospital, I can tell you have a good upbringing. Most girls wouldn’t care about who they move in with after going through what you have gone through; yet you are bothered about that.”

    LINK TO AVAILABLE EPISODES

    Episode 4

    Episode 5-6

    Episode 7-8

    Episode 9-10

    Episode 11-13

    Episode 14

    Episode 15-17

    Episode 18-20

    Episode 21-24

    Episode 25-27

    Episode 28-30

    Episode 31

    Episode 32-33

    Episode 34

    Episode 35

    Episode 36

    Episode 37

    Episode 38

    Episode 39&40

    Episode 41

    Episode 42

    Episode 43

    Episode 44

    Last Episode

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    #1305561 Reply
    BUKOLAMIBUKOLAMI
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    Wow! Interesting

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    CHRISTIAN WISDOM DAVIDCHRISTIAN WISDOM DAVID
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    Don’t worry they just drive u to your destiney.

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    #1305586 Reply
    dencygirldencygirl
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    interesting… more episode pls

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    @itzprinz
    I don’t know how too…i even want to complain bcoz m not seeing my post on updated stories

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    Episode 3

    Seeing she had hurt the girl deeply, Efe stood up and left the hospital. Though she paid for every ounce of Ekaette’s hospital bill, Efe was never seen in the hospital again. However there was a newly employed medical doctor who took a lot of interest in Ekaette. He was often around to have banter with her. About the time Eka was to be released from hospital, the young doctor, who went by the name Gerry, noticed that Eka became very moody and listless. So she pressed her to know what was wrong with her. For days Eka refused to answer him a word, but Gerry was persistent and kept asking her what the matter was with her. Eka dug her feet in and refused to give say much. On the day she was to be discharged from the hospital, she packed her stuff into her Ghana-must-go bag and made ready to check out of the hospital, and then Gerry showed up and took her to the little bunk which served as his office and pressed harder, “I know you are in some trouble, don’t lie to me. You were in this hospital for two weeks and not one member of your family came to visit you. I have not heard you speak of your father, mother or siblings. What are you hiding?” Eka burst into tears and told Gerry about everything that had happened to her. Gerry was shocked and brought to tears by her story. “Eka, I am not going to let you let you go into the street without anywhere to lay your head or money to survive on. I live in a two bedroom apartment all by myself. I can let you have one room. In fact I want you to take that room. I know people in this place who can help you get job as a cleaner. Please don’t go into the street. It is hard out there, you won’t survive it alone.”
    “No! I won’t take your offer doctor Gerry. You think I don’t know your plan. You want me to move in with you and become your toy, and tomorrow your girlfriend will come and throw me out. I know about all that. I have seen girls fall for it. I won’t do it. Yes I know I need help, but I won’t accept your offer.” Doctor Gerry almost went down on his knees and pleaded with her soulfully, “I am older than you are by some years Ekaette, and I know what the street is like. Believe me you don’t want to go into it with this your beauty and no financial support. Life and circumstances will push you into things that right now you think you can never do. I swear by God, I won’t take advantage of you. And if you accept my offer and find out tomorrow that I have gone against our understanding, you are free to leave my apartment. Look, you know me and my place of work; if I do anything stupid you can always come here and report me to my superiors. Please don’t go into the street without knowing even where you will sleep tonight or what you will eat.”
    Ekaette thought about Gerry’s words and squeezed the two hundred Naira Simbi gave her; it was all she had. “Okay Doctor Gerry I will accept your offer because I don’t have a better one right now. But I swear by God, if you do anything stupid, I will strip myself and curse you by night.” “It won’t come to that Ekaette. I promise you I will make you forget you once were thrown into the street by your family. One day you will look back and you will be happy you took my offer.” “I hope it all works out well, but if you try to put me through hell, I will curse you and kill myself. I mean every word of what I have just said.” “Ekaette you worry a great deal.” “I should and worry is my right. I don’t even know anything about you except your name. Moving into your apartment scares the daylight out of me. I wish I don’t have to do it. What if you wake up in the night and kill me for rituals? Who would ask you questions? After all my parents have rejected me.” “Stop! Ekaette stop! I don’t remember having seen anyone as negative as you. One, nobody is going to kill you for rituals. Two, worry is not your right; it actually hurts you more than you think.” “You have to understand Doctor Gerry that I do not have any reason to trust you. I am not being negative, but protective of myself.” “I have heard you Ekaette, no harm will come to you, okay. Now leave your bag here, let’s go get something to eat.” Reluctantly Eka left her Ghana-must-go bag in Doctor Gerry’s office and they left for the food canteen. When they entered the canteen heads turned in their direction as if they were being choreographed; and voices began to whisper. Ekaette felt very uncomfortable at the starry host of ocular daggers stabbing at them. Twice she missed her step and Doctor Gerry caught hold of her.
    The medical and non-medical staff who stared at them did not do so in disgust, but in sublime awe of the beauty which entered the canteen in Doctor Gerry’s company. However Eka did not know the reason for which they looked at them and whispered. Before the steward who would take their order could arrive, Eka had begun to perspire terribly and could hardly speak. Gerry noticed the change in the look of her face and asked, “Eka what is it? You don’t look alright to me.” Eka couldn’t speak; when she parted her lips words simply failed to come out. Gerry had to gently press her once more for answers, “Eka what is wrong with you?” When the words finally came out, they did so with tears, “They…they are…they are talking about me. Maybe someone… knows…” Eka began to choke terribly on her words, coughing and breathing deeply. Gerry understood that moment how much Eka had been hurt and lacerated by what she suffered in her street and in her parents’ hands. Doctor Gerry tried his best to stabilize her; when Eka had come round fully, he led her out of the canteen and those host of eyes admiringly followed Eka and Gerry out of the canteen.
    When they came back to Gerry’s office, he did his best to convince her that those people in the canteen were not talking about her, “Eka I actually heard them; some of them are my colleagues. They were not talking about you. Believe me there was no one there who knows you. There was no way they could have called you a witch.” While Gerry persuaded her that no one called her a witch, hot tears freely flowed from her eyes. “I thought I heard them calling me names. For a moment I thought I heard the word ‘witch’.” “Eka they were talking about your beauty. They were all swayed by your beauty. Believe me, when you start working here as a cleaner, most of the men who saw you today will press you out of measure with love advances and crazy gifts. Get ready for them. I want to take you home now, if you were to stay around here for a while longer, you will notice my office will become busy. All those men and women will come to ask me who you are. I know them.” Fearfully Eka asked, “Who will you tell them that I am?” “What do you want me to tell them if they ask?” “Tell them I am your sister.” “No Eka. I won’t tell them that. I will tell them that you are my friend, a good friend at that. I will speak of amazing things about you.” “But you know nothing about me to tell them.” “On the contrary I do. I know you are the prettiest woman my eyes have seen. I know you are very hard working. I also know you can make fruit salad, you told me about it the other day. And from our conversations since you came to this hospital, I can tell you have a good upbringing. Most girls wouldn’t care about who they move in with after going through what you have gone through; yet you are bothered about that.”

    4+
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